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Thread: uneven boulder Opal

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    West Berkshire
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    Default uneven boulder Opal

    I have a very uneven boulder to set and wondered if I put some blue tack underneath if this would work?
    I can't play around with the Opal very much because the layer of Opal is very thin and I am worried in case it chips (again). I had to send it away to be re-polished and it now looks fab. I am not going to set client's stones any more, much too stressful....Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Central London
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    Default

    Hi Theresa,
    I have seen all sorts of packing underneath commercially set stones, but they need to be pretty hard, or they will crack
    You don't say what kind of setting you have in mind, but I guess a bezel setting would be too tall and cumbersome to show off a delicate stone.

    I would make a backplate to conform to the stone, cut out part of the centre to make it easier to adapt and add about six claws.

    For the curvature of the backplate, I would take an imprint with Polymorph, or Coolmorph, and use and use it like a doming block to forge it into shape.

    Dennis.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
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    1,503

    Default

    Don't ever use blue tack it breaks down over time, personally I would bezel set and just shape the bezel to fit, or you could use a basket setting, whatever style of setting you use it will need to shaped to fit,
    if it is for a pendant you could attach two long lengths of metal from the bail cap along the back coming up underneath and forming claws at the base, ( hope that makes sense ) this could also be adapted for a ring.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    West Berkshire
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Hi Theresa,
    I have seen all sorts of packing underneath commercially set stones, but they need to be pretty hard, or they will crack
    You don't say what kind of setting you have in mind, but I guess a bezel setting would be too tall and cumbersome to show off a delicate stone.

    I would make a backplate to conform to the stone, cut out part of the centre to make it easier to adapt and add about six claws.

    For the curvature of the backplate, I would take an imprint with Polymorph, or Coolmorph, and use and use it like a doming block to forge it into shape.

    Dennis.
    I have already made the bezel setting which I thought would give the edges the best protection (the client likes it). Claws would be too harsh leaving the edges vulnerable to chipping.

  5. #5
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    Dec 2009
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    Central London
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    Well then, I guess the question is about supporting the ends inside the bezel.
    There is a choice between having the back plate curved as already mentioned, or adding a wire bearer at each end, inside the bezel for support. Dennis.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Hi Theresa,
    I have seen all sorts of packing underneath commercially set stones, but they need to be pretty hard, or they will crack
    You don't say what kind of setting you have in mind, but I guess a bezel setting would be too tall and cumbersome to show off a delicate stone.

    I would make a backplate to conform to the stone, cut out part of the centre to make it easier to adapt and add about six claws.

    For the curvature of the backplate, I would take an imprint with Polymorph, or Coolmorph, and use and use it like a doming block to forge it into shape.

    Dennis.
    Great idea. I'm going to use that. Why not use the polymorph to form the bearer structure then the backing plate could be flat. Probably a lot better than some fillers jewellers use.

    Sent from my BTV-W09 using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Central London
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    Default

    Well Steve, using metal is what jewellers do, sometimes to the detriment of delicate stones.
    Giving the setting a curved back, would reduce the height of the bezel, and make it look less clumsy. Dennis.

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