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Thread: Which handgraver for cleaning bezel after setting.

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by misspond View Post
    No need to guess when you're making a bezel, take a look at your stone and see where the curve starts. This infographic from Lucy Walker is useful Attachment 12916
    Thanks. I can't read it but I will try and find the original.

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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steved View Post
    Thanks. I can't read it but I will try and find the original.

    Sent from my BTV-W09 using Tapatalk
    Yes, sorry about that, I couldn't fine a better graphic for some reason. But if you Google "bezel height" and use the image tab you'll find lots of examples of how to gauge the height of a bezel for any given stone. Ideally you want to have just enough metal to push against where the curve of a stone starts and getting that right before you start soldering is key.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by misspond View Post
    Yes, sorry about that, I couldn't fine a better graphic for some reason. But if you Google "bezel height" and use the image tab you'll find lots of examples of how to gauge the height of a bezel for any given stone. Ideally you want to have just enough metal to push against where the curve of a stone starts and getting that right before you start soldering is key.
    I found the original and she recommended 1mm above the beginning of the curve , which doesn't seem like a lot to me .I have the feeling it depends on the profile of the stone. So ultimately it comes down to experience and practice. Just got to put in my time.

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  4. #14
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    I know it doesn't seem like a lot but it's really all you need. There's a definite art to using high bezels and being able to work them down in a way that looks good without all of the crinkling and wrinkling that occurs, and if that's the look you're going for then it's worth finding a way to do it so that it's aesthetically pleasing. You'd be surprised at how little metal is needed to hold a stone in place.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by misspond View Post
    I know it doesn't seem like a lot but it's really all you need. There's a definite art to using high bezels and being able to work them down in a way that looks good without all of the crinkling and wrinkling that occurs, and if that's the look you're going for then it's worth finding a way to do it so that it's aesthetically pleasing. You'd be surprised at how little metal is needed to hold a stone in place.
    Well I'll be trying soon . It will be interesting. Thanks for the comment.

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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by misspond View Post
    Yes, sorry about that, I couldn't fine a better graphic for some reason. But if you Google "bezel height" and use the image tab you'll find lots of examples of how to gauge the height of a bezel for any given stone. Ideally you want to have just enough metal to push against where the curve of a stone starts and getting that right before you start soldering is key.
    I started to follow that jeweller and she is recommending from .5mm to 1mm above the curve. I've been using between 2mm and 4 mm . I get anxiety thinking of a .5 mm bezel. I'm still going to try it.

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  7. #17
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    The idea is to show off the beauty of the stone, and not to obscure it with metal.

    A final measurement (after finishing) of O.5mm above the start of a curve can be sufficient to hold in a cabochon, because it is difficult to get any purchase on a dome to dislodge it.

    But you're right to worry. A 0.5mm tall bezel strip will be very hard to set, particularly with solder at the base.

    To remedy that, an experienced jeweller would use a taller bezel where possible, and lift up the stone with a jump ring. If there is a back plate no soldering is required, and the jump ring does not even have to be fully closed. Dennis.

  8. #18
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    It is one of most misunderstood processes when setting with bezels it is surprising just how little you you require to hold the stone.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldsmith View Post
    I use a scorper with a polished cutting face to cut and clean up bezel settings.

    Attachment 12914

    James
    James - your work is always perfect, I have yet to see any flaws. Wonderful

  10. #20
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    Yes, you don't need a 0.5mm bezel, just 0.5mm from were the stone starts to curve. I have some very flat rose cut slices where the side of the stone is around 1mm or less, they can be set with a bezel that's just over 1mm high made from slightly flattened fine silver wire, but for regular cabochons I'd be very surprised if they started to curve from the base and didn't need a little bit of height in the bezel. Just to reiterate, it was the visual representation of what to look for that I was trying to get across with the graphic I posted earlier in the thread.

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