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Thread: Blackened stamping on rings

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
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    29

    Default Blackened stamping on rings

    Hi there,

    Does anybody know what could be used to black stamping on rings? I know about liver of sulphur and also about the impressart paste you can use. The paste seems to be no longer available, just the pen but I find this doesn't blacken out stamping as well as the paste.

    I'm wondering if there is something I could use on rings that is going to be long lasting? Obviously with rings, people are going to be washing their hands whilst wearing the rings and I just wondered if there was a more durable alternative to liver of sulphur or impressart paste/pen?

    I have twisted ring a friend bought me from way back and the grooves of the twist are blackened out with something. It's definitely not liver of sulphur and I'm pretty sure it cannot be the impressart paste as I think it would have worn off by now but it's stayed black in those parts for years even with showering/bathing etc. I'm not looking to do this particular ring as such but I would like to be able to do stamped/engraved rings knowing that the blackened out parts are going to last.

    Would be grateful if anyone could advise?
    Many thanks
    Lou x

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,480

    Default

    Enamel, would be the most long lasting I can think of otherwise dyed epoxy e.g. Araldite, same process fill valleys and smooth off the hills

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    East Anglian
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    Default

    What a good idea! What do you use to dye Araldite please?
    David.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    South Australia
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    Default

    I use Lamp black powder ( I do not know if it is true Lamp black) because I have it (Inherited from my father a little goes a long way) although any artist supply will will have a suitable pigment in powder form that can be used, if you are really dedicated, light up a kero lamp or similar catch the carbon from the flame on a ceramic tile and scrape it off, and you have genuine lamp Black.
    P.S. You don't have to restrict yourself to black.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    East Anglian
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    Default

    Thanks.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Oxfordshire
    Posts
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    Default

    There's lots of different ways to apply patina to engraving. I came across a post on Steve Lindsay's engraving forum recently, he was replying to a query which I found interesting.

    https://www.engravingforum.com/showthread.php?t=13412


    He has a wealth of experience blackening engraving.

    Edit: I've checked the links which are on the post and they now seem dead! Don't you just love the internet. I have seen elsewhere the use of printers ink/pigment for engraving so that may be worth exploring.
    Last edited by alastairduncan; 25-02-2021 at 11:10 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruedeleglise View Post
    What a good idea! What do you use to dye Araldite please?
    David.



    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Back in the day we used ground ebony dust, more recently Iíve used crushed drawing pastels because it was all I had. Iíve used powdered dyes in the past too
    Last edited by CJ57; 25-02-2021 at 11:44 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Romsey
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    Default

    Interesting point about Rustoleum; I've not seen that so much with Humbrol enamel, which is more readily available in the UK. I have found that the eco-friendly printing inks are very, very slow to dry.

    Sandi Sturgeon advocates powder coat mixed in with (Rustoleum IIRC) paint and heated, which sounds like a recipe for powder coat plastic blooming everywhere although it would increase the pigment...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Oxfordshire
    Posts
    179

    Default

    I also came across this post a few days ago but found it difficult to find again.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CLCSD-CFUtu/

    The ink used here is gamblin
    https://www.google.com/search?q=gamblin+etching+ink

    The ink Steve Lindsay recommend is Cranfield.

    https://www.cranfield-colours.co.uk/...s/relief-inks/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Thank you China, I will look into this.

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