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Thread: Brooch Pin

  1. #1
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    Default Brooch Pin

    I've finally got started on an 80th birthday present for my aunt. Have made the flower and the two bezels for the little golden topaz cabs (Though i did manage to accidently squash one a bit, oops). i want to attach these to a bar brooch. Anyone got any suggestions for a clean modern brooch pin mechanism. The bar is going to be really narrow, about 3mm -4mm wide.
    Last edited by Sheen; 03-02-2021 at 08:24 AM.

  2. #2
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    I'm sure you already know a lot about this Sheena and there is more on U tube. Here is Nancy Hamilton, she's always good for a laugh.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXQQmLLpn_g Dennis

  3. #3
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    I'd love to know more than I do, which is very little it would be great to have a book just about brooch pins and all the differant ways to do it. Anyone fancy writing one?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    I'm sure you already know a lot about this Sheena and there is more on U tube. Here is Nancy Hamilton, she's always good for a laugh.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXQQmLLpn_g Dennis
    Thanks Dennis, i'd forgotten that Nancy did a video on this. I do wish what I read and see would stay in my brain better!

  5. #5
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    This is part two: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRInmaILUCo

    For a narrow brooch, you would use a single pin. The catch and hinge can be soldered on as separate items and the pin added and bent in place afterwards.

    A length of stainless steel wire can be annealed to bend it more easily, and will still be hard enough to function.

    Before use it will need to be rubbed up with a Scotchbrite pad, or sand paper to restore the shine
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Low Tech Solutions Using Tubes..jpg  
    Last edited by Dennis; 03-02-2021 at 08:43 PM.

  6. #6
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    This is what I have so far.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I don't have a lot of soldering experience so this one's really going to test me. The flower is made up of three parts with the possible addition of two tiny bits for the front of the flower. The bar is going to have a brass strip added to the top and the hinge and catch added. The stones will either have a step or back plate added. What should be my sequence of soldering? I was assuming I could construct the bar and the flower separately then put the two together. Is that correct? I'm a little concerned that my flower is curved and it'll collapse during soldering.

  7. #7
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    Looking good so far Sheena, although the bezels dont need a separate backing, they can go straight onto the bar.

    Problems arise if you slowly build up your piece without thinking. It can even get too big for a little torch to work. Here is my choice of sequence.

    1. Compete the soldering of the flower itself (hard) and set aside.
    2. Solder the hinge and catch onto the back of the bar with hard solder, turn it over and make holes in the block so the bar sits flat the right way up. This will protect your findings for the next stage.
    3. Solder on the bezels with easy solder.
    4. Sweat some extra-easy solder onto the back of the flower (make sure the back has a good flat area for this)
    5. Support the flower in place, push in a little more extra-easy solder and reheat for the last time.

    If the solder will not flow at the final stage, you might need a bigger torch, or two little ones, one in each hand. Work in a darkened area, so that you can see where the torch is being directed. Don't linger too long in any one place, but keep the torch moving. Dennis.

  8. #8
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    Thankyou so much for this Dennis, it's going to make me feel like i know what i'm doing and can solder with confidence. i'll let you know how i get on it will also give me more of an idea with other projects, what order to solder is always an issue for the newbie

  9. #9
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    Mmm I just tried to solder my brass strip to the side of the silver strip and my silver melted where the brass was touching. I think the brass must get hotter than the silver. Any tips? I've noticed before that brass has a tendency to melt the silver it's touching and sink into the silver.

  10. #10
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    I had another go, used a little less heat and didn't put any direct heat on the brass . The top bar was the one that melted, the one below my second attempt.

    Click image for larger version. 

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