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Thread: Attaching Clock hands

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Guildford, United Kingdom
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    383

    Default Attaching Clock hands

    Hi everyone! Iím in the middle of a project Iíve actually been working off & on for years! I think itís NEARLY there now. I have a silver base piece in the shape of a clock face which is etched in fine detail. I also have created tiny clock hands made of bronze. I used bronze for strength and also liked the contrast in colour. I want to attach the hands to the clock face - Iíve first tried Ďcheatingí by using tiny joining screws which do work ok but they donít look the best and they are difficult to keep holding tight. Would doing a rivet be the best way? Iíd like the hands to be moveable but also a sturdy enough join that itís not likely to break apart. If a rivet (which Iím not too experienced at) would a bronze wire to match the hands be the best option? This will not be an actual working clock but I still thought it would be fun to be able to change the time to whatever the person wanted. Any advice would be hugely appreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
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    Default

    Hi Sandra, I think you have answered your own question a rivet would be my choice, I would use bronze as you say to match the colour, shape the front side to your liking then peen over the back side, until it is at the desired tension.
    When riveting, cut the length so it only has the minimum amount to peen over, makes the process easier.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Guildford, United Kingdom
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    Default

    Thanks China, sometimes I feel like a perpetual jewellery student as I don’t do jewellery-making regularly enough! I’m a member of “At the Bench’ and watched a few riveting videos today and realised this was one of my very first jewellery making techniques I learned years ago. So long ago now I’d nearly forgotten!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    8,254

    Default

    For delicate things my preference would be to use a tube rivet, which can be spread by inserting and rotating a scriber or needle and avoids the hammer. As Bob has said, keep it fairly short.
    Silver tubes start at 1.0mm and the rule of thumb is to leave as much projecting, as the diameter of the rivet.
    Practice first, before doing the real one. Dennis.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
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    Default

    Dennis I agree a tube rivet would be the easiest, although to match the colour you would need a bronze rivet, I know of none available you could make your own

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
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    Default

    I’d say the same about riveting. Without seeing the clock design it’s up to you whether the rivets are the same colour or as an artistic element a contrasting colour

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Guildford, United Kingdom
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    Default

    Thanks everyone, I’m going to look online for more info on using a tube to make a rivet. I like the idea of not using a hammer at this point too. I may actually just change the hands to silver to make things easier!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Guildford, United Kingdom
    Posts
    383

    Default

    Could I just ask in regards to sterling tube rivets - where is a good source to buy these from? Or would you just use regular silver tube?
    Last edited by Sandra; 23-10-2020 at 08:02 AM.

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