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Thread: Does anyone recognise this brand of rolling mill?

  1. #1
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    Jun 2017
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    Default Does anyone recognise this brand of rolling mill?

    Hi everyone!

    I've been very lucky and came across this old rolling mill which I nabbed for a fabulous price. Aside from the rust and dirt, it's in perfect working order and I shall be rolling my sleeves up asap to try to get it back to its former glory.

    The mill doesn't seem to be branded anywhere, so I was wondering if any of you would have any idea what I'm looking at?

    Thanks in advance and any tips on getting this beauty back into shape would be much appreciated.

    D x

    Sent from my CLT-L09 using Tapatalk

  2. #2
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    Dec 2009
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    Hi Nina. Its a good looking mill, very similar to my 23 year old Durston, so maybe its a far eastern copy.

    I would not be too radical, but just clean the grooves and rollers with medium and then fine steel wool and WD40, which comes as an oily spray.The grooves probably need a small steel brush with oil, and the paintwork just an oily rag.
    Wear vinyl gloves, as rubber will dissolve.
    You can also direct the spray inside the gear box and other hidden places.

    The mill should go round smoothly,without any strange noises, which might signal a broken gear (a problem with cheap lookalikes).

    Then put through a copper test sheet and measure with callipers. If one side comes out thinner than the other, you have to take off one of the top connecting gear wheels and turn that side manually by raising or lowering it.

    When using your mill, always be patient and don't advance it too much at a time, and anneal often as needed, or the results will be poor. Dennis.

  3. #3
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    Jun 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Hi Nina. Its a good looking mill, very similar to my 23 year old Durston, so maybe its a far eastern copy.

    I would not be too radical, but just clean the grooves and rollers with medium and then fine steel wool and WD40, which comes as an oily spray.The grooves probably need a small steel brush with oil, and the paintwork just an oily rag.
    Wear vinyl gloves, as rubber will dissolve.
    You can also direct the spray inside the gear box and other hidden places.

    The mill should go round smoothly,without any strange noises, which might signal a broken gear (a problem with cheap lookalikes).

    Then put through a copper test sheet and measure with callipers. If one side comes out thinner than the other, you have to take off one of the top connecting gear wheels and turn that side manually by raising or lowering it.

    When using your mill, always be patient and don't advance it too much at a time, and anneal often as needed, or the results will be poor. Dennis.
    Thanks Dennis! Will get started straight away

    Sent from my CLT-L09 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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    As Dennis said just one thing as a alternative, I am a fan of Scotch brite pads rather than steel wool, steel wool tends to leave little bits of annoying steel everywhere.

  5. #5
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    Yes you're right Bob it did cross my mind, and not a good situation if some is rolled into silver, or falls into the pickle pot.
    The green Scotchbrite as in pot scourers, has a bit more go to it than the brown, but it wears out quickly, so you need plenty. Dennis.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by china View Post
    As Dennis said just one thing as a alternative, I am a fan of Scotch brite pads rather than steel wool, steel wool tends to leave little bits of annoying steel everywhere.
    Thanks China!

    Sent from my CLT-L09 using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    Feb 2011
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    West Berkshire
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    I've seen that style of Rolling Mill a lot on US sites. Perhaps it's American?

  8. #8
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    The oldest mill of that design (1950's) I have seen is made buy Denkel in Germany, they are highly regarded, Durston early mills were of that design, the Jewellers and Goldsmiths I have discussed mills with tend to favor this design as being superior, the one above carries no brand it could be from any where although it looks to be well made,
    Denkel was making this style well into the 2000's. most manufacturers have now gone to the "less cost to make" one piece casting style.
    Last edited by china; 20-09-2020 at 04:16 PM.

  9. #9
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