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Thread: Maintenance polish

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    East Anglian
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    224

    Default Maintenance polish

    I have been asked recently by people what polish to use to keep silver / brass/ gold jewellery bright and shiny. I have used MAAS for a long time on the brass components of clocks. However what do you use please?


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    South Australia
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    For home maintenance, I would recommend warm soap and water with a "soft" brush thoroughly dry, then polish with a Jewellery polishing cloth otherwise take it to a competent Jeweller.

  3. #3
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    Feb 2011
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    I agree with Bob. Washing up liquid on a soft sponge keeps it fresh and grease free as general maintenance.Then a silver cloth such as Goddard readily available in supermarkets or hardware shops. They also so a tub of polish with a sponge which you then rinse off then dry with a soft duster. This one is good if there are more intricate areas to get into. If I use that one I tend to do the soap wash after as I don’t think it smells so good especially if it’s near your face

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    West Midlands
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    I use Town Talk silver cloths and find they bring things up to a good shine. If using washing up liquid, I always use a good quality one, rather than a cheappie.
    Jules

  5. #5
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    The washing up liquid used in the jewellery dept at ECA was probably industrial strength green stuff. As strong as needed to take off the rouge and everything else. I can honestly say I’ve tried different brands and use the cheapest

  6. #6
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    Central London
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    The jewellery you wear develops a patina, which is personal to you. So it is counterproductive to bring it up like new.
    Dennis.

  7. #7
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    Dec 2014
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    South Australia
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    I agree 100% Dennis, unfortunately convincing some individuals is like trying to find the end of of a rainbow.

  8. #8
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    Must be a man thing as I like my jewellery to look as good as new otherwise why would I wear special pieces if it had built up patina, to me that’s just dirt.That’s not how people buy them or why would be bother getting that great finish. If on the other hand women want to have food in their pendant and it’s so patinated you can’t even clean it then I give up and I did!

  9. #9
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    South Australia
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    I see patina different to dirt, clean it by all means just don't polish the heck out of it, but then again every one is different so I suppose we need to be tolerant of other opinions, problem is I have seen jewellery that has been so lovingly polished that it no longer has any definition left.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Scotland
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    I don’t bother about rings as everyday use does the cleaning for you but I’d want a dress piece to be looking good otherwise why would you dress up and add jewellery that isn’t at its best. If a customer has sprayed perfume on her solver necklace or earrings and they are covered in black spots, is that accepted as patina or would it be expected that you’d at least take a silver cloth to them.
    Does that mean you’ll never clean your kilt accessories, buckles etc?
    Last edited by CJ57; 12-08-2020 at 07:38 PM.

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