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Thread: Tube setting woes

  1. #1
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    Default Tube setting woes

    I'm trying to set some 4mm round faceted stones. My sterling tube is OD of 5mm, ID 3.8mm, with a .6mm wall. I've got a 4mm frazier burr, plus a 4mm ball burr.

    I use the ball burr, until I can see a 'gap' around the stones edge, so I assume I can then go in with the setting burr and set the ridge for the stone to sit on. When I get to this stage, I've for 3mm of wall left, so its close! I've tried holding the tube against the benchpeg and using the frazier with the foredom from above. Then putting my tube in a vice, making sure its level both ways and again, going in with the foredom. Both ways have produced bad results.

    I've been practicing this on and off for a few weeks and have set some stones ok, but really want to get this consistent and its definitely not!. Attachment 12544 This was my first attempt.

    This is the tube I was working on yesterday. I tried stone setting burr on it, but it produced a wonky line, which isn't good.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Is this a case of practice practice, or have I got something wrong?

    Any help or tips would be much apprciated, before I consume an entire block of chocolate!
    Last edited by Petal; 25-06-2020 at 11:39 AM.
    Jules

  2. #2
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    Default

    These are just comments Jules I'm not a proficient setter by any means. You don't state what you are not happy about, what do you want to improve?

    Quote Originally Posted by Petal View Post
    My sterling tube is OD of 5mm, ID 3.8mm, with a .6mm wall. I've got a 4mm frazier burr, plus a 4mm ball burr. |
    This would leave a 0.1mm seat this seems to me a bit small.

    Quote Originally Posted by Petal View Post
    I use the ball burr, until I can see a 'gap' around the stones edge
    |
    If you can see a gap then the stone can move when it is being set. As there is only a small seat (0.1mm) I could see that some of the stone may not be on the seat.

    I just use ball burrs I've not used a setting burr. This seems to provide a good enough seat for the stones. I try and get a fit which requires the stone to be pushed in so that it is fairly tight. If its flush set then I want a tight fit which requires more than a light push to get the stone to seat.

    As I say I'm not a proficient setter so other advice may differ.

  3. #3
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    Default

    I'm not very good at explaining what I mean, but I'm trying to improve using the stone setting burr, but thought you had to use a stone setting burr, in order to set faceted stones, rather than just using a ball burr?

    The gap around the edge, is what I'm assuming I'll need to fold over the edge of the stone, but perhaps I'm leaving too large a gap?

    0.1mm seat size - what size of tube should I be aiming for then?

    I've taken a couple more pics, to try and show what is happening and hope that helps?
    Jules

  4. #4
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    Default

    Hi Jules, there are various tricks that can help you, many of which you will know already. Forgive me if I go Through them all.

    Measure with callipers to ensure stone, tube and burrs all match up. The stated sizes are not the true sizes.
    Get the end of the tube perfectly at right angles by filing on one of these
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/QUALITY-FIL...30806588&psc=1

    Hold the tube in one hand, over your bench peg, or if it is too short hold it in the jig just mentioned.

    When inserting the setting burr hold the handpiece in your fist as if it were a potato peeler, not a pen, using the thumb of that fist to steady it against the bench peg.

    You can also get a better result and preserve the sharpness of setting burr, by turning it manually in a wooden handle like this:
    https://www.cooksongold.com/Jeweller...let&channel=uk But it will have to be tight so the burr does'nt slip. Dennis

  5. #5
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    Hi Dennis,

    Many thanks for the tips and its fine that you are going through them all, as I sometimes misunderstand things.

    I'm filing the tube on the mitre jig to ensure its flat, before I start burring and I now use the whole length of the tube, as its easier to see if the stone is set correctly, or not. I can then easily pop it out, if it isn't. I measure with callipers the stone and burrs.

    So is the tube I am currently using thick enough to set the stones I already have, or should I be going for something slightly thicker?

    I've just ordered a wooden handle, as I'd just spotted that in one of your previous posts.
    Jules

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petal View Post
    I've taken a couple more pics, to try and show what is happening and hope that helps?
    No pics attached

    edit: ive just seen it added to the original post ;-)
    Last edited by alastairduncan; 25-06-2020 at 12:26 PM.

  7. #7
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    No. The proportion of tubing to stone diameter is quite enough. I often go a fraction smaller, if necessary drawing the tubing down.
    You will find that copper is soft and liable to enlarge when doing this, so it's easier with precious metals.

    I agree with Alastair that you should not see a gap around the stone at any time. Plenty of setters don't bother with setting burrs, but for me it is comforting that they give you a collet that supports the stone well, even when the seat is very narrow.

    Round burrs are cheap and cut fast, but are larger used on their sides, so best to use them only end on.

    A little oil does wonder for burrs, both for speed of cutting and preserving their sharpness. Dennis.

  8. #8
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    Glad the proportion of tubing to stone is fine.

    The gap is tiny and seen through my loupe. However, I'm trying to set the stone so it sits just proud of the tube, with enough wall to push over. If I don't have the gap, then the stone sits too high, so I burr some more off, but then the stone constantly flips and won't sit level, so that was why I went with the ball burr, which like you, I use end on.

    Right, I'm off to have another go, thanks again Dennis and Alastair.
    Last edited by Petal; 25-06-2020 at 01:47 PM. Reason: spelling error.
    Jules

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