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Thread: Hair Today and Gone Tomorrow.

  1. #1
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    Default Hair Today and Gone Tomorrow.

    With hair growing longer and hair dressers closed, I Thought it was time to make some acrylic barrettes. Here are some of my efforts below.

    The acrylic sheet was heated in the kitchen oven to 165C and then formed around the rim of a Pyrex bowl.

    There were plenty of barrette findings being sold on line, but when they came they were flimsy and rough in action, so I cannibalised some ready-mades instead, where the clips were of much better quality and still not too bad on price. They were easily removed and transferred.

    Unfortunately the stock quickly sold out. The next shipment wont be delivered for weeks, by which time the need will be over.
    Hair today and gone tomorrow. Dennis.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hb1 Hair Barrettes.jpg   Hb2 Other Versions.jpg  

  2. #2
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    These are lovely Dennis. I would wear them all but particularly like the first one

  3. #3
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    I love those Dennis and my favourite is the first one too, as I love the shape of it.

    My hair has now got to the Dougal from the Magic Roundabout stage, so its pinned up every day now, as my fringe is so long I can't see!
    Jules

  4. #4
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    Love those Dennis

  5. #5
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    Thank you Caroline, Jules and George. I found the lattice ones quite tricky, because the material is difficult to work, so you are seeing my third and fourth attempts. Dennis.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Thank you Caroline, Jules and George. I found the lattice ones quite tricky, because the material is difficult to work, so you are seeing my third and fourth attempts. Dennis.
    I would imagine until the acrylic starts to melt it remains quite bulky and moves? It’s settles so nicely it looks as if it’s been cast

  7. #7
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    Dennis don't tell people that, let them think you a wizard and get everything correct the first time, good job by the way

  8. #8
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    Well Caroline The material is quite resistant to cutting by hand, and although I use gap toothed blades intended for wood veneers, they tend to jam and you have to use lots of wax. The lattice is started with thin cutting disks, which need control so they don't cross a line. Then I go on to three square needle files. A false move that can't be cleaned up and you start all over.

    Thank you Bob, but as I am not counting the cost of labour, I often back track rather than go in for remedial work. Even so, as you know, the maker knows where all the little faults are and the camera discovers the rest. Dennis

  9. #9
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    That’s a lot of work Dennis. I’m a student of the 70s so I was using a lot of Perspex then and in the early 80s. I used a very coarse coping saw and remember what hard work it was. It’s amazing how little damage was done by a rasp to move things more quickly!.There were no cutting discs so i really admire the finesse of the lattice work

  10. #10
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    The basket weave is my choice Dennis. As you say perspex is not the easiest material for hand tools. I worked as a modelmaker for a while and the place where I worked had 2 pantographs one was 3d. I have used these for intricate pieces in various plastics and base metals. It would be ideal for these but that would defeat the objective of being hand made. A pattern is made much larger and reduced using the pantograph, corners would have to be trimmed out by hand.

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