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Thread: Prongy business

  1. #1
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    Default Prongy business

    when you're struggling to keep all your bits aligned, then you sudddenly remember what Dennis told you years ago and why you bought that vermiculite board
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  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Default

    Yip
    Going to ask you a few questions shortly

  4. #4
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    I usually see people soldering their frame, pickle it, then solder on the prongs. I'm currently soldering everything in one go to keep the number of steps down, any reason I really shouldn't? also when I'm coming to solder the ear post on the back i'm just sanding a wee section for the join. i'm reckoning keeping the oxidisation from the previous soldering work will help protect the previous joins
    For those pro jeweller's; is what I've described making you shrivel up inside?
    Also, I was told by a teacher that I didn't need to flux the join just the pallion/solder ball. how's that for living dangerously
    Last edited by Sheen; 22-06-2020 at 04:24 PM.

  5. #5
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    I think living dangerously is the name of the game. It's also called economy of effort.
    You certainly dont need pickling until the final joint is soldered, provided you flux other parts in advance and dont dunk them in water. Dennis.

  6. #6
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    This might sound like a very annoying post but there's good reason for such madness. Usually I'm very conscientious, obsessed with doing things properly in the correct way. But due to my current situation I have very little energy for soldering, the more steps there are the less I can do. So this is very much an exercise in seeing how much a person can get away with bodging the job. I would say if anyone else is trying it, i personally won't do this sort of thing on a large piece of silver (too expensive to be fooling around).

    Ps I've also been told I don't actually need to bother cleaning my metal before I start (unless it's really filthy) that works too

  7. #7
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    The way I see it if you use a different method to the correct way and it works then who cares, it's called "innovation"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by china View Post
    The way I see it if you use a different method to the correct way and it works then who cares, it's called "innovation"
    It's very interesting to test the boundaries

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