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Thread: Can I use 9ct solder on 18ct gold

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
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    24

    Default Can I use 9ct solder on 18ct gold

    Hi,

    I'm trying to make a kind of birds nest pendant using lots of very fine bits of 18ct gold wire. I have a mix of yellow, white and rose gold.

    I've only very occasionally worked with gold before (soldering gold balls onto silver, etc) so I have a few questions please:

    1/ To save money, can I use 9ct solder to fuse 18ct gold wire? If so, is there anything I need to change about technique?
    2/ When I'm soldering rose to white gold, should I go for white solder?
    3/ When I'm soldering rose to yellow gold, what colour solder should I use?

    If you have any other hints that you think I should know please do let me know

    Thanks so much
    Emmy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    South Australia
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    Default

    Normally best to use the same ct solder as is the gold you are working with, using a different ct will show the solder joints more easily as it will be a different colour, would also affect the Assay value,
    rose gold to white gold, you could use either solder the problem you will have is one colour bleeding onto the other, you would need to make your joint very tight and maybe use a resist to prevent the bleed over, e.g. if you would use a resist on the white gold if you use rose gold solder and visa versa. Just as side note rose gold and solder in my experience is virtually impossible to match.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
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    24

    Default

    Thank you China.

    What is a resist? Is it flux or something different?

  4. #4
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    Dec 2014
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    No resist is the opposite to flux you apply it where you do not want the solder to flow, I use jewellers rouge mixed with water, to make a very fine slurry I am told you can use liquid paper although I have never tried it
    another alternative is yellow ochre, used the same as rouge

  5. #5
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    Default

    I’m putting this out there as I don’t know but would using a lower grade solder not change the hallmark issued!

  6. #6
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    That is what I meant with "would also affect the Assay value".

  7. #7
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    Aug 2019
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    Oxfordshire
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    This quote is from the hallmarking guidance:

    'Precious metals rank in order as follows, starting with least precious: silver, palladium, gold, platinum. When an article comprises of two or more precious metals, the hallmark of the least precious metal is applied. Wherever possible a “part mark” (ie. The fineness mark of the more precious metal) is applied to the more precious metal component of the article. An article can only have one full hallmark, but it can have multiple part marks. Please note, mixed metals need to be distinguishable by colour in order to obtain both the full hallmark and the relevant part mark."

    So you may get more than one part mark but only if there is somewhere to put the mark and the different metals need to be distinguishable. You may get a full mark for 9ct and part marks for 18ct. A bit of a mess really, it would be better to stick to 18ct if at all possible.

  8. #8
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    Sorry Bob I didn’t read all your post and it probably didn’t register as I know you don’t have to

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    If you are working in gold, it is a false economy to save a couple of £ on the solder. Check eBay, there are sellers who sell tiny amounts
    www.Pearlescence.co.uk
    @pearlescenceltd
    instagram: pearlescenceltd1

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Central London
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    There,s no need even to do that, Wendy. You can buy solder in wire form and just get a few mm. Dennis.

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