Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: For beginners

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,242

    Default For beginners

    Just thought I would post this you channel I found it by accident for any one just starting out it seems to have a lot of simple easy to understand info
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWQ...NIdhYT2cB3IMzQ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Interesting, not one I've come across before. If anyone is on instagram, I highly recommend @makeitkimtoday she has made short video on everything from texturing, reticulation to basket settings and granulation

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    7,768

    Default

    Yes I watched the flush setting video Bob and it is very skilfully done. Dead easy in fact until you first try it. Dennis.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Oxfordshire
    Posts
    117

    Default

    I've recently used the flush setting method but I don't have any confidence that the stone is really secure. What I've not seen anywhere are guidelines on the maximum size of stone that is realistically practical to set with this method.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,242

    Default

    How true looks really easy on screen, I remember years ago when I first tried flush setting I thought all was fine, until the stone just fell out, then I realized you actually need to push the metal not just make a shiny mark.
    I have not viewed all her video's the ones I have I found to be a no nonsense approach, a lot of video's out the presenter faffs around for 3/4 of the time before you get any useful info

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    7,768

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alastairduncan View Post
    I've recently used the flush setting method but I don't have any confidence that the stone is really secure. What I've not seen anywhere are guidelines on the maximum size of stone that is realistically practical to set with this method.
    Most jewellery uses sheet no more than 2.0mm thick, or has a patch added at the back to accommodate the stone without it poking through. Stones of 4.0mm and more would become increasingly vulnerable to pressure from behind.

    The real problem arises with curved surfaces, such as rings made of rectangular wire, where the stones have to be buried deeper to cover the girdle. This becomes even worse with D-shaped and oval profiles. So as a rule of thumb, the stone diameter is best kept to no more than a third of the width.

    Dennis.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Oxfordshire
    Posts
    117

    Default

    All good advice Dennis. The piece I've set is a brooch and I did put a doughnut on the reverse to protect the stone, it is a 4mm cz. I wanted it flush as its an enamelled piece and I think it looks better without a separate fixture which is attached. However, that comes with all sorts of risks. I think the main one for me was I was pushing very hard, all the time thinking if I slip here it's going to make a big mess. It was set after it had been enamelled. So bearing in mind how hard I was pushing for a 4mm stone, what would I have to do for a 7or 8mm stone. Would it be reasonable to want to flush set a stone of this size in this manner? All of the larger stones that I have seen have been hammer and punch set and then the mount filed to shape afterwards but in my case that would have been impossible.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    7,768

    Default

    I don't think that the size of the stone would limit you on a flat, deep surface, but setting could become long winded and tedious.

    It seems to me that you would benefit from a Foredom with a hammer attachment, which is less prone to slip, although the vibration might still disrupt the enamel?

    Another route if you have a compressor is to set with a pneumatic tool.

    Lastly a cheap and dirty system, is to insert a suitable point (or reverse the pointed one and reshape the other end) into a vibrating engraver, which can cost 20 or less on line.
    The noise is awful, but it does the job. Dennis
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Dremel Engraver As Setting Tool.jpg  

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Oxfordshire
    Posts
    117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    I don't think that the size of the stone would limit you on a flat, deep surface, but setting could become long winded and tedious.
    This is the nub of my question, would it be reasonable to say set a 10mm stone by rubbing it in this way with a burnisher? What is the largest size anyone set with this method? Its not that I want to do this, but the question for me popped up because I didn't find the 4mm stone easy and I'm unsure of whether it is really secure, it was a question to see what others more experienced with this method of flush setting might attempt. I may be doing it incorrectly, but knowing what is possible will help in the the design process further down the line, what is reasonable and what is not? If I know its possible to set larger stones like this I'll have a practice until I get it right or more likely good enough.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    although the vibration might still disrupt the enamel?
    Exactly and the other factor is cleanup of a surface that is flush with the enamel. Fine for more traditional flush/gypsy settings where cleanup isn't a problem although I'm happy with my hammer and punch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Another route if you have a compressor is to set with a pneumatic tool.
    I have a pneumatic power assist for engraving but the problem again is the vibration and cleanup.

    Thanks for the suggestions Dennis

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •