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Thread: Cupronickel coins - illegal?

  1. #1
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    Default Cupronickel coins - illegal?

    Hi All,

    I am just starting out with coin ring making and purchase a large quantity of post 1947 Florin coins (two shillings) to get me up and running as they are fairly cheap.

    The coins are 75% copper / 25% nickel.

    Iíve just read that jewellery containing nickel is illegal in the UK unless it is coated with a non-nickel substance and tested by the Assay office, or has a leach quantity below a certain level (again needing testing).

    If this is the case, my plans are somewhat scuppered as Iíd planned to just lacquer the inside of the rings with a clear coat / nail varnish.

    Iím surprised as there are sellers on eBay selling these coin rings..?

    Could I get round this by stating the rings are not to be worn and are ornaments/keepsakes only?

    If anyone has any direct experience or knows how this sails Iíd be very grateful for the advice.

    Turtle.

  2. #2
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    You cannot make rings and sell them as jewellery. Just sell them on as as they are and put it down to experience. Dennis.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    You cannot make rings and sell them as jewellery. Just sell them on as as they are and put it down to experience. Dennis.
    Thanks Dennis,

    I fear this is what I may end up doing.

    What about the numerous people on eBay selling such rings (florins, ten pence coins etc.)

    Some state they have coated the rings to protect the wearer, others just warn that the rings might leave marks on the wearers fingers!

    Are these people not hounded by the authorities and prosecuted?

  4. #4
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    They may be sellers in the US where it isn’t illegal and if not should be reported to Trading Standards who just don’t seem to have the time or maybe the inclination to take up all the infringements of laws on metals

  5. #5
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    There is good reason to be cautious. Some people react really badly to base metal jewellery, with blistering and raw, swollen, weeping skin. Their reaction gets worse with time and is with them for life

    So we are not just talking about a rule book, but about potential injury. Dennis.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJ57 View Post
    They may be sellers in the US where it isnít illegal and if not should be reported to Trading Standards who just donít seem to have the time or maybe the inclination to take up all the infringements of laws on metals
    Nope. They are UK based seller, selling uk coins (two shillings and ten pence coins to name but a few.)

    I imagine itís the UK authorities who are obviously not bothered about this.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    There is good reason to be cautious. Some people react really badly to base metal jewellery, with blistering and raw, swollen, weeping skin. Their reaction gets worse with time and is with them for life

    So we are not just talking about a rule book, but about potential injury. Dennis.
    Quite right too.

    What are your thoughts on plating the rings Dennis? Either with silver or copper?
    Last edited by Turtle; 20-09-2019 at 10:40 PM.

  8. #8
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    Plating does not last long on rings and wears off in patches. Dennis.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turtle View Post
    Nope. They are UK based seller, selling uk coins (two shillings and ten pence coins to name but a few.)

    I imagine itís the UK authorities who are obviously not bothered about this.
    Well if they are selling them as jewellery and not just coins then they need to educate themselves like the rest of us. If they are as numerous as you say maybe no one has reported them. Itíll not exactly be high on the priority list of TS but then youíd think the more people are reported the more reason to deal with it. None of us would do potential harm to customers

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turtle View Post
    I imagine itís the UK authorities who are obviously not bothered about this.
    Quote Originally Posted by CJ57 View Post
    Well if they are selling them as jewellery and not just coins then they need to educate themselves like the rest of us... Itíll not exactly be high on the priority list of TS but then youíd think the more people are reported the more reason to deal with it...
    But how many people report this issue to TS? How many are even aware of it?? I wasn't, until I read this thread (thanks for posting it) and the OP stated that they had only "just read" about it.

    Unfortunately in the UK, enforcement of such regulations tends to be reactive rather than proactive and the TS people have bigger fish to fry. What presents a greater danger to public safety - a few dodgy rings or a couple of thousand, counterfeit electrical products?

    Education is the key here IMO. If you're that concerned, then maybe you could start a thread in the Ebay forums, to alert people to the problem; or add posts to YouTube videos which describe how to make these items. People may not thank you for it, though; you may even attract some ridicule - but at least the information will be out there, for those with eyes that see and ears that hear.

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