PDA

View Full Version : Which DSLR camera?



roxics
03-12-2018, 06:26 AM
Hello

I'm thinking about investing in a decent camera to better document my and my friends adventures / climbing / lives. I am not the slightest bit techie so didn't know what to look for therefore I have looked to friends for assistance.
As I am not very techy I don't want a complicated camera or one that's heavy however having looked at both reviews, both appear to be light weight .
I have had compact/bridge cameras in the past and enjoy taking photographs so I am wanting to get more creative with photography but more importantly want a clearer more detailed photogrpah.

roxics
07-12-2018, 04:00 AM
I have been hesitating these days, until today I decided to choose Nikon digital SLR camera series.

roxics
07-12-2018, 04:01 AM
I hesitate in the following cameras. Which one do you think is better? https://thedigitalcamera.net/best-nikon-dslr-camera/
I am very anxious, please help me, thank you.

ps_bond
07-12-2018, 08:01 AM
Given this forum is focused (no pun intended) on jewellery making, I'd say that a good macro lens is more important than the camera body. Camera bodies are constantly being updated, but the lens line up is more rarely changed. One thing with Nikon is you should be able to use older lenses with no issues - I've got a 55mm macro manual lens that I use on mine, for example. I also have a more modern 105mm f2.8 that is my usual go-to.

As for your requirements of documenting adventures/climbing/lives etc. there are sites better suited to that than this one. I'd not want to take a DSLR climbing, for example - I'd prefer not to carry the extra weight.

Dennis
07-12-2018, 01:07 PM
For table top photography, you will also need a tripod, or if there is no room, a way to clamp your camera to the table.

I have a Manfrotto Magic arm but it drives me mad, needing regular adjustment of the tension using Alan keys, or it can droop suddenly, so endangering the camera. Avoid. Dennis.

mizgeorge
07-12-2018, 04:43 PM
roxics,
are you actually intending to take pictures of jewellery? Or are you just looking for general camera advice, in which case a photography forum might be the more appropriate place to direct your questions.

NickD
13-12-2018, 05:09 PM
Hello

I'm thinking about investing in a decent camera to better document my and my friends adventures / climbing / lives. I am not the slightest bit techie so didn't know what to look for therefore I have looked to friends for assistance.
As I am not very techy I don't want a complicated camera or one that's heavy however having looked at both reviews, both appear to be light weight .
I have had compact/bridge cameras in the past and enjoy taking photographs so I am wanting to get more creative with photography but more importantly want a clearer more detailed photogrpah.

Hi folks,
I have seen some affordable cameras for sale and was wondering what type / brand of lens you would recommend for close ups of jewellery/ metal items? I know next to nothing about the subject.Did I mention...? I'm not a millionaire.
Thanks,
Nick

ps_bond
13-12-2018, 07:43 PM
Look for name brand lenses - Nikon, Canon, Sigma, Tamron. For smaller objects I like a 105mm (ish) that can focus close; larger objects - bowls and the likes - I can either go further back or switch to a shorter lens.

I can't speak so much for other brands - been using Nikon for 30 or so years - but because the mount has stayed the same on Nikon, I can fit older lenses and use them still. Many of the whizzier features may not work - metering being the usual victim - but they still function, albeit basically sometimes. I've just been messing with attaching my Nikon body to my scope trinocular - the scope's from the 70s (and is also Nikon) and is one of the only ones around where you can set the trinocular view to either left or right lens (so stereo microphotography becomes an option).

Camera bodies come and go (not quite on an annual cycle, but close to it). Good glass is there for a lifetime. Find a lens you like, whether new or second-hand - check the reviews - and then worry about what body to fit it to.

In, as always, my opinion.

Dennis
13-12-2018, 10:55 PM
Depends on what you intend to take you pictures for. If it is to record your work and post pictures on a web site, you might get all you need from a modern compact camera, which will also double for social purposes.

Stick with either Nikon or Canon and study the hand book and you will build up a knowledge base for that marque that can still be used should you upgrade in the future. You might start with the fully automatic function and gradually experiment with the others.

Read the reviews on line and aim for a mid range price within you budget. Superseded models will be cheaper.

There are many online tutorials on 'table top photography', 'product photography' and 'photographing jewellery'. Dennis.

handmadeblanks
13-12-2018, 10:56 PM
Hi folks,
I have seen some affordable cameras for sale and was wondering what type / brand of lens you would recommend for close ups of jewellery/ metal items? I know next to nothing about the subject.Did I mention...? I'm not a millionaire.
Thanks,
Nick

The few people I know who are photography enthusiasts tell me a PRIME lens gives the best quality photos.

what-is-a-prime-lens-why-use-one (http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/1803/what-is-a-prime-lens-why-use-one/)

china
14-12-2018, 05:34 AM
A prime lens has only one focal length i.e. no zoom, so to get closer you have to move closer and to get further away you have to move away. A prime lens will produce a sharper better quality image due to fact there are no moving lenses inside equals less bits and pieces for the light to bounce around and create distortion.

Goldsmith
14-12-2018, 09:08 AM
If you are used to using a compact / bridge camera and want to have better photos than you took before, how about just investing in a higher quality compact camera. I have a lot of experience with photography and have many cameras and lenses, these include Nikon DSLR cameras with Nikkor lenses. But in recent times I have been using a Lumix LX5 compact and a Lumix FZ45 bridge camera. Both have fine quality Leica lenses and I get fine quality photos of both close up and standard wide angle shots.
I just took these close up photos of a ring I made using my Lumix LX5, taken by a window with just daylight for lighting.

11715 11716

James

NickD
14-12-2018, 09:26 AM
If you are used to using a compact / bridge camera and want to have better photos than you took before, how about just investing in a higher quality compact camera. I have a lot of experience with photography and have many cameras and lenses, these include Nikon DSLR cameras with Nikkor lenses. But in recent times I have been using a Lumix LX5 compact and a Lumix FZ45 bridge camera. Both have fine quality Leica lenses and I get fine quality photos of both close up and standard wide angle shots.
I just took these close up photos of a ring I made using my Lumix LX5, taken by a window with just daylight for lighting.

11715 11716

James

Thank you so much everyone.This is certainly the place to come. You've all given me plenty to think about.
Nick

Goldsmith
14-12-2018, 11:43 AM
Just for interest here are a couple of photos of the same set up taken with different cameras for comparison.

One taken with my Lumix FZ45 at f8 and the other with a Nikon DSLR fitted with a nikkor 60mm. macro lens, both photos taken hand held in daylight, cost difference between cameras circa 1000.

11719 11720

James

NickD
15-12-2018, 06:27 AM
Just for interest here are a couple of photos of the same set up taken with different cameras for comparison.

One taken with my Lumix FZ45 at f8 and the other with a Nikon DSLR fitted with a nikkor 60mm. macro lens, both photos taken hand held in daylight, cost difference between cameras circa 1000.

11719 11720

James

I think the Lumix would be fine for my use but what extra lens would I need for shots like those?
I ask because I've seen several of these cameras for sale on ebay.
Thanks,
Nick

Goldsmith
15-12-2018, 09:05 AM
I think the Lumix would be fine for my use but what extra lens would I need for shots like those?
I ask because I've seen several of these cameras for sale on ebay.
Thanks,
Nick

Nick, My Lumix FZ45 has a fitted Leica Zoom lens and It has a decent close focus and my photo was taken with the standard fitted lens, if you do buy one just make sure that it has a Leica lens. This is my Lumix; https://www.amazon.co.uk/Panasonic-Lumix-14-1MP-Digital-Camera-x/dp/B003WOKU4W/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1544864544&sr=8-1&keywords=lumix+fz45

If I was looking to buy a newer model I would consider this one; https://www.amazon.co.uk/Panasonic-DMC-FZ1000EB-Bridge-Camera-25-400mm/dp/B00M0LQVEQ/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1544864674&sr=1-2&keywords=lumix+fz1000

Cheers,
James

Goldsmith
15-12-2018, 10:38 AM
I thought I would post a selection of photos taken with my Lumix cameras, I have two, both fitted with Leica lenses.

11731 11732 11733 11734 11735


James

NickD
15-12-2018, 06:00 PM
I think the Lumix would be fine for my use but what extra lens would I need for shots like those?
I ask because I've seen several of these cameras for sale on ebay.
Thanks,
Nick

Sorry, rereading this it seems I'm asking my original question again and disregarding e.one's advice. I'm not. As I said, I know v little about photography. When you said " a Lumix FZ45 at f8", does that mean with a standard- non macro- lens?
(Hope this reads better :O/)

Goldsmith
15-12-2018, 06:53 PM
Sorry, rereading this it seems I'm asking my original question again and disregarding e.one's advice. I'm not. As I said, I know v little about photography. When you said " a Lumix FZ45 at f8", does that mean with a standard- non macro- lens?
(Hope this reads better :O/)

Yes the photo was taken with the standard Leica zoom lens that is fitted to this camera, this camera does not have interchangable lenses. For close up photography I set the camera program knob on A, which means aperture priority and by turning the control wheel at the rear of the camera I can choose whatever aperture I want and for close ups, the higher the aperture number the greater the depth of field, so more of your photo is in focus.
I hope this makes sense Nick.

James

NickD
16-12-2018, 10:47 AM
Perfect James. Thanks for your explanations. I wanted to make sure before buying.
Cheers,
Nick

handmadeblanks
17-12-2018, 08:51 AM
Perfect James. Thanks for your explanations. I wanted to make sure before buying.
Cheers,
Nick

Keep the Exposure Triangle handy whenever taking pictures!

exposure-triangle-making-sense-aperture-shutter-speed-iso/ (http://petapixel.com/2017/03/25/exposure-triangle-making-sense-aperture-shutter-speed-iso/)

NickD
18-12-2018, 07:57 AM
Keep the Exposure Triangle handy whenever taking pictures!

exposure-triangle-making-sense-aperture-shutter-speed-iso/ (http://petapixel.com/2017/03/25/exposure-triangle-making-sense-aperture-shutter-speed-iso/)

OK. Thanks. All advice very much appreciated.
Nick

Lux Aeterna
20-09-2019, 06:19 PM
A bit late to the party for this one, but...

I just bought a Canon Powershot SX720HS, to replace the one that I dropped (which would have survived, if the lens hadn't been scratched when it hit the ground).

Not a DSLR, but a fantastic little camera nonetheless. Great macro capability (you can get as close as 1 centimetre to the subject) and excellent image stabilisation (I've managed to get crisp, handheld images at a 0.5 second shutter speed). It has a 40x optical zoom, too and shoots full HD video at 60fps.

There are also some good deals to be had at the moment - I paid 199 for a bundle including battery, charger, pocket tripod and a fairly decent carry case. The 730 and 740 have more bells and whistles, but the same lens and sensor.

jay-ell
26-02-2020, 09:07 PM
Hello

I'm thinking about investing in a decent camera to better document my and my friends adventures / climbing / lives. I am not the slightest bit techie so didn't know what to look for therefore I have looked to friends for assistance.
As I am not very techy I don't want a complicated camera or one that's heavy however having looked at both reviews, both appear to be light weight .
I have had compact/bridge cameras in the past and enjoy taking photographs so I am wanting to get more creative with photography but more importantly want a clearer more detailed photogrpah.

What a big can of worms you've opened here - theres lots of choices and no doubt there will passionate advocates for each option.

So will you be partaking in the climbing and adventure part? Are you looking to take videos or just stills?

If you're hanging off a cliff you might be a tad preoccupied (and ran out of spare hands) to hold, focus and shoot a full frame DSLR camera so if this is going to be you main use you might want to look at an action camera which has a smaller sensor (this means it won't be as good in low light) but a large depth of field (more things in focus automatically) and can easily be strapped to your head.

If, however, you plan to keep your feet on terror firma then you'll be wanting a camera set up with a decent zoom and here is where you enter Pans Labrynth - its so easy to get lost.

Are you going to be marching all over the place or will everything come straight out the car, snap and then straight in again? How you plan to use the camera will dictate choices in lens and camera.

Do you mind a big bulky set up or would you be wanting a small and lightweight system.

One superzoom lens to do it all or do you want to have interchangeable lenses?

For many the Full Frame DSLR is the pinnacle, but these can be big and bulky. DSLRs have a mirror set up which adds bulk - you could look at mirrorless cameras which dispense with the mirror and either are smaller or use that space for other things (extra heat sinking, processing, memory, etc)

Read up on full sensors and crop sensors on the net but for a very brief explanation here goes:

A "Full frame sensor Camera" has an image sensor that is the same size as a 35mm film negative frame.

A crop sensor has an image sensor that is smaller than the 35mm frame. Because it is smaller then for a given lens size the crop sensor will only see a section of the image than a full size - this basically means that it gets an instant magnification for the lens which is given by its crop factor - e.g. I have a Micro Four Thirds sensor - its sensor has a crop factor of 2 (this basically means that I multiply the lens I'm using by 2) . If I use a 100 to 300mm lens and multiply the lengths by 2 so it gives the same field of view as a 200-600mm lens on a full frame camera

HOWEVER because my sensor doesn't use the full image, my lens doesn't need to project the full image back into the camera so it can be made smaller and lighter using less glass so for the equivalent full size lens (albeit not necessarily cheaper because the lens must be able to project a clear image onto the smaller sensor)

So to sum up my ramblings - you will first need to define your main usage of the camera down to the microscopic :) .

Full Frame cameras can produce great photos but their set ups can also be big, bulky and heavy .
Cropped Sensors systems can be alot smaller and lighter for the same field of view, but won't have the same low light performance. They also produce a deeper depth of view - i.e. more things will be in focus. This might not be a problem depending on what you want to photograph.

DSLR cameras are larger and heavier, mirrorless cameras can be smaller and lighter.

If you don't want the expence/hassle/headache of having extra lenses then a bridge or superzoom camera might be the way to go.

Are you looking more for photos/videos/both as this will change the playing field quite a bit.



But there is one thing that doesn't look as it it's been covered.

Over the last few years the cameras inside smart phones have improved to such a degree that i[hone footage has been used by holy-wood producers. Add on lenses have also improves in leaps and bounds so that now these add on lenses still produce good quality images. A modest set up of adding on a wide angle, 2x and 4x telephoto plus a case that allows these to be screwed in would give a decent set up - ad to that the fact that you almost always have your phone with you.

mizgeorge
27-02-2020, 12:51 AM
jay-ell - there's some excellent advice there - thank you, but the thread is over a year old (it's just been bumped up by yesterday's necropost) and the OP hasn't been back to the forum since they first asked. I suspect they were not here in any seriousness to start with.

china
27-02-2020, 04:17 AM
"necropost" so that that's what you call it, today was not wasted I learnt something

ps_bond
27-02-2020, 07:20 AM
I suspect they were not here in any seriousness to start with.

I'd agree.

I've started picking over the article linked to by the necroposter, but so far it seems to be very poorly written, with nothing but the occasional vague, generic hint.

jay-ell
27-02-2020, 07:34 AM
jay-ell - there's some excellent advice there - thank you, but the thread is over a year old (it's just been bumped up by yesterday's necropost) and the OP hasn't been back to the forum since they first asked. I suspect they were not here in any seriousness to start with.

I realised that just after hitting post. Oops.