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vernon
18-10-2015, 03:04 PM
Does anyone know why when you watch American tutorials they call it Soddering!

ps_bond
18-10-2015, 03:55 PM
Same reason they call herbs 'erbs.

ajda
18-10-2015, 04:28 PM
Does anyone know why when you watch American tutorials they call it Soddering!
Maybe because the tutorial is actually showing you how to bugger it up? (Apologies if mods need to strike out the bad language.)

ps_bond
18-10-2015, 04:37 PM
I've been digging a bit on that one - it may be one of the words where the drift in pronunciation is on the UK side, supposedly to avoid the association - rather than the usual committee-defined rationalisation of the language.

CJ57
18-10-2015, 05:36 PM
If you google it there are some less than kind explanations so I won't repeat them! One person did say that although everyone round her said solder at school it's spelling is solder

Wallace
18-10-2015, 05:53 PM
I have noticed sometimes, there is also the term 'heigth' , which irks me rather a lot.

Aurarius
18-10-2015, 07:13 PM
I hear the American pronunciation (don't know whether it's universal across N. America) as being more like "sardering" with a non-rhotic "r".
Like others I was a bit surprised by it when I first met it. I've actually grown to like the easier pronunciation compared with ours, though I won't be emulating it.
In many instances the Americans make much better tools than we can offer, so they can pronounce things how they like as far as I'm concerned.

rockshelley
18-10-2015, 07:30 PM
I say soldering like "saadering" ... When I discovered that a friend of mine from Britain pronounces the L...I was surprised.

Rock Shelley
www.rockshelley.com

Dennis
18-10-2015, 09:13 PM
But I presume you pronounce the 'll', in Shelley?

Sandra
18-10-2015, 09:14 PM
I have noticed sometimes, there is also the term 'heigth' , which irks me rather a lot.
Heighth is not an accepted word in American English either, it's just people who don't know any better or maybe just the local lingo. Much like the area I live in Surrey where I hear people often pronounce their "th" as a "f". Instead of three it's pronounced as free for example, I find it very annoying!

Sandra
18-10-2015, 09:17 PM
Btw I pronounce it "sodder" as well. As hard as I try pronouncing the L in solder - it just doesn't feel right LOL. There are many words with the silent "L", like could, would, should, talk, walk, just for starters. And don't get me started on words like Worcestershire and Leicestershire!

emsterv
18-10-2015, 10:59 PM
I pronounce it 'sodder' as well (Canadian). That's just the way I've always heard it said. Only one person I know pronounces it "solder" which sounds bizarre to me. We've kept a lot of language related things from the British (colour vs color etc) but solder didn't survive the trip across the sea I guess. At least not where I am.

Aurarius
18-10-2015, 11:34 PM
We've kept a lot of language related things from the British (colour vs color etc) but solder didn't survive the trip across the sea I guess. At least not where I am.
But it may be the case that it is a survival, as Peter suggests, and Br. English ˈsəʊldə represents a shift.

Goldsmith
19-10-2015, 07:19 AM
I am approaching the age of 70, so am I older than most on this forum or am I odder?

When I was young I am sure that soddering was illegal.

James

metalsmith
19-10-2015, 07:41 AM
"Sodder"! Wllbloddyell wassthasallonabaht? Ifiss drift yerluckinfor sthemyanksforshaw. Themmort contintents anyroad. Welladdworktutfouto'rarstairs!! Issolder in Yorkshire. Nobbut... gerritreet ...

ssssue
19-10-2015, 01:55 PM
Reminds me of when my Canadian cousin visited some years ago - she couldn't understand what I was talking about when I mentioned I'd seen a squirrel in the garden. Eventually she understood but said "oh, you mean a skwerl" (phonetic spelling obvs!). [emoji12]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

rockshelley
19-10-2015, 02:35 PM
But I presume you pronounce the 'll', in Shelley?

Haha! Of course I do! I was just taught not to pronounce the L in Soldering even before I new how to spell soldering. When I found out how it is spelled I thought it was stupid but just chalked it up to another of the English languages quirks.

Rock Shelley
www.rockshelley.com

CJ57
19-10-2015, 03:12 PM
Haha! Of course I do! I was just taught not to pronounce the L in Soldering even before I new how to spell soldering. When I found out how it is spelled I thought it was stupid but just chalked it up to another of the English languages quirks.

Rock Shelley
www.rockshelley.com

Which brings us back to the fact that both countries may be English speaking but there the similarity ends :) it's really just the word sold with an er on the end which if you live in certain parts of Scotland then becomes more of an errr!

Sandra
19-10-2015, 04:16 PM
Speaking of pronunciations of "er" in the above comment - when and why do you suppose that the letter "r" became silent in England's English, yet in Ireland and Scotland it is still pronounced? And in the USA of course, unless you are from certain parts of the east coast where you can still hear the old English accent.

Aurarius
19-10-2015, 05:18 PM
Speaking of pronunciations of "er" in the above comment - when and why do you suppose that the letter "r" became silent in England's English, yet in Ireland and Scotland it is still pronounced? And in the USA of course, unless you are from certain parts of the east coast where you can still hear the old English accent.
Weakening and consequent loss of post-vocalic "r" can probably be dated to before the 15th century. This sort of thing usually happens because the pronunciation is found to be quicker/easier. If the new pronunciation can claim some prestige as well (and non-rhotic varieties of Br. English rightly or wrongly have, or at least had, this prestige) then it is likely to gain acceptance all the more quickly.

Aurarius
19-10-2015, 05:22 PM
Which brings us back to the fact that both countries may be English speaking but there the similarity ends :) it's really just the word sold with an er on the end which if you live in certain parts of Scotland then becomes more of an errr!
I think it's generally thought to be George Bernard Shaw who said: "The United States and Great Britain are two countries separated by a common language."

CJ57
19-10-2015, 05:37 PM
I think it's generally thought to be George Bernard Shaw who said: "The United States and Great Britain are two countries separated by a common language."

That's the one Mark!

metalsmith
19-10-2015, 08:53 PM
Weakening and consequent loss of post-vocalic "r" can probably be dated to before the 15th century. This sort of thing usually happens because the pronunciation is found to be quicker/easier. If the new pronunciation can claim some prestige as well (and non-rhotic varieties of Br. English rightly or wrongly have, or at least had, this prestige) then it is likely to gain acceptance all the more quickly.

From the date, this may also possibly be due to the interaction between the English and French - not just the wars - the English sovereignty held lands in France and French was the language of the royals - together with their propensity to drop the final vowel, would endow the pronunciation with significant prestige (you'll notice that many Englishwords associated with elevated class are also French).

vernon
20-10-2015, 07:49 AM
Apparently the food channels on TV have interesting American channels with foods we have never heard of!

metalsmith
20-10-2015, 12:00 PM
Apparently the food channels on TV have interesting American channels with foods we have never heard of!
:offtopic:
Yeah - I had to look up Corn-dogs the other day. Looks like MRM filth on a stick. No wonder ... enough said... [[]]

Sandra
20-10-2015, 03:30 PM
:offtopic:
Yeah - I had to look up Corn-dogs the other day. Looks like MRM filth on a stick. No wonder ... enough said... [[]]
Aww corndogs aren't so bad - it's just a frankfurter covered in corn bread, on a stick :) It's the sort of thing you'd find at a festival next to the candy floss/cotton candy booth.
The British too have many foods that Americans aren't familiar with. In fact I posted a picture of "Toad in the Hole" on facebook lately and had to explain to my American friends what it was. That does make sense about the English method of dropping the "r" sound due to the French influence - interesting. Both British and American English just evolved in different ways over the centuries for various reasons, I wouldn't say one is 'more' correct than the other, just different! Getting back to jewellery however, that's another difference. Jewelry vs. Jewellery!

metalsmith
20-10-2015, 03:52 PM
Aww corndogs aren't so bad - it's just a frankfurter covered in corn bread, on a stick :)

Presumably deep-fried? So the corn-bread ... doesn't it come out with more oil than the average middle east country. Show it to 'Bear' Grylls and he'd probably set fire to it and throw himself down a hole in the ground (except Yorkshire's beginner caves proved to frightening for him :rofl:)!!

Death on a stick, it looks like. [-X

Getting back to jewellery however, that's another difference. Jewelry vs. Jewellery![/QUOTE]

v Jouaillerie. Can I have another consonant please?

Sandra
20-10-2015, 04:07 PM
The ones you buy at a festival are most likely deep fried yes, in supermarkets you can find ones that are baked in an oven. Not that I seek out corndogs mind you LOL. Is it any worse than those batter covered deep-fried sausage rolls I see down at my local chippy? I think not!

metalsmith
20-10-2015, 04:14 PM
The ones you buy at a festival are most likely deep fried yes, in supermarkets you can find ones that are baked in an oven. Not that I seek out corndogs mind you LOL. Is it any worse than those batter covered deep-fried sausage rolls I see down at my local chippy? I think not!

I suspect that you see them, but neglect to ingest them?!

more534
26-10-2015, 07:56 PM
ugh corn dogs are NOT food.

I'm in Ontario, and we pronounce it: sodder. oh look, my auto correct is trying to spell it correctly! :D

now, POUTINE on the other hand....
had to add...if you try to say it like a "Newfie" ( a person from Newfoundland) it would come out: saadrrrr and I can't even begin to write that phonetically!