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Patstone
30-10-2014, 08:31 AM
Can anyone suggest a book on semi-precious gemstones for identifying purposes. Tumbled stones rather than raw uncut minerals as I want to check out what I have and could do with a good colour photo, rather than a drawing. Thanks in advance.

SteveLAO
30-10-2014, 09:34 AM
The one I found really useful was called "gemstones of the world" by W Schumann. you can still get it through the Gem-A bookstore - I think it's about 15 or so.....

Dennis
30-10-2014, 10:26 AM
The problem with books Pat, is that we all have different likes and dislikes in how they are set out and how much technical detail we want to read through.

I have not seen Steve's recommendation, but my most used one is Dorling Kindersley Handbooks: Gemstones. if possible look at them in a shop first.

For browsing stones once identified. AE Ward and Son online store is a good resource. Regards, Dennis. Dennis.

SteveLAO
30-10-2014, 11:06 AM
6852 here is a picture of the pages in Schumann......rhs is a colour picture and lhs is all the technical details and a description including sources......it's been my bible for 30 years as a gemmologist....

10k
26-06-2015, 12:32 AM
There are bunch of books to find on Amazon or ebay. I also got my books there. I hope you are more talented than me. Until today I have my big problems with semi precious gemstones. Good luck!

Tabby66
26-06-2015, 04:56 PM
I would recommend the same book as Steve, the "gemstones of the world" by W Schumann has all the essential information you should need. It is clear and concise and easy to find your way around. I find it interesting and fairly easy to read and dip in and out of :)

sarahjohn5
24-07-2017, 12:44 PM
I recommend you The Classification, Identification, and Characteristics of Gemstones - A Collection of Historical Articles on Precious and Semi-Precious Stones & Firefly Guide to Gems. This book is so informative, so inclusive. Hope it's helpful. Have a nice day

Wallace
24-07-2017, 02:54 PM
I recommend you The Classification, Identification, and Characteristics of Gemstones - A Collection of Historical Articles on Precious and Semi-Precious Stones & Firefly Guide to Gems. This book is so informative, so inclusive. Hope it's helpful. Have a nice day

Very interesting... first post in an old thread! Normally a trick reserved, as I understand, for those with a taste for luncheon meat.

ps_bond
24-07-2017, 03:06 PM
All too often.

I've got Schumann handy (but for faceted I prefer Gem ID Made Easy).

Wallace
24-07-2017, 03:35 PM
I have gemstone two books, one is Schumann, cat remember the other! I have sooooooooo many jewellery making related books! Refused to downsize my library when I moved! I have a dip in my house, ironically, where the books are kept! Lol

Might be useful again in the enxt couple of years. 47 days to go!

ps_bond
24-07-2017, 03:39 PM
"Downsize" "Library"?
You've lost me :)

2 gemstone books. Erm, I may have a couple more than that. Lapidary, identification, faceting, setting, eye candy (e.g. Munsteiner)...

Wallace
24-07-2017, 06:12 PM
"Downsize" "Library"?
You've lost me :)

2 gemstone books. Erm, I may have a couple more than that. Lapidary, identification, faceting, setting, eye candy (e.g. Munsteiner)....
Sorry, I was being silly!

I won't get rid of my books! Seems I have enough for their own section in any Wiltshire library! Just so many over the 14 years. Some I Have been as Gifts, many were my own purchases, and one is a rescued book.

jagoja9
25-07-2017, 10:41 AM
Hi Peter,

I notice that you are into gemstones and semi-precious. I have a supplier for rough uncut gemstones and semi-precious stones. Wondering if these might be of any interest to you. Thanks. Joshua.

Snorkmaiden
26-07-2017, 08:36 AM
Hi Patstone, I used to be a geologist but started with a childhood polished stone collection. Most commercially bought stones can easily be identified with good photos - preferably several examples of the same stone because they vary so much - as they tend to be from a limited range. It is much harder from a photo when they are stones collected and tumbled for a hobby as they could be anything from anywhere. Normally you would try a few other tests like hardness, streak, crystal shape (if still obvious) and lustre. You could treat yourself to one of those little gemstone cards with stones stuck on. I know they look a little tacky but they are a great starting point.